Jump to content

Welcome to Chinese Crested Crush
Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. If you already have an account, login here - otherwise create an account for free today!
Photo

Genetics of a Hairless Breed

* * * * * 1 votes

  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1
Chelsey

Chelsey

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • 16,349 posts
A wonderful article written by a long time crested breeder, Nancy Larson, outlining the differences amung genetics, and the varying degrees of hairlessness in the chinese crested. 22.www.ourcresteds.com/downloads/chinesecrested.doc

#2
talese

talese

    Pup

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 33 posts
Broken LinkThe link doesn't seem to work anymore, even after I removed the 22. Any suggestions?

#3
Astaroth

Astaroth
  • LocationSweden
It´s working for me..http://www.ourcreste...nesecrested.doc

#4
talese

talese

    Pup

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 33 posts
Oh weird, now it works...it must have been something on my end...so sorry! :oops:

#5
haircrazie016

haircrazie016

    Best In Show

  • Members
  • 2,736 posts
will anyone post it, I dont have word on my mac.

#6
cc

cc

    Canine Good Citizen

  • Members
  • 544 posts
Here is the article minus the 3 pics ....hope you enjoyCCThe Chinese Crested - Nature's "Chinese Puzzle" By Nancy LarsonThere is a fascinating member of the Toy Group known as the Chinese Crested, a "toy" dog that has two varieties. A hairless variety that includes hair on the head, tail and feet, and a puff, a fully coated counterpart with a long double coat. However, within each of these two varieties, we have some rather dramatic variations. The hairless:The AKC standard for the breed says, "The Hairless variety has hair on certain portions of the body: the head (called a crest), the tail (called a plume) and the feet, from the toes to the front pasterns and rear hock joints (called socks). The texture of all hair is soft and silky, flowing to any length. Placement of hair is not as important as overall type. Areas that have hair usually taper off slightly. Wherever the body is hairless, the skin is soft and smooth."This "ideal" is what breeders aspire to achieve within their breeding programs, although it is not as easy as it might first appear. The gene that causes the hairlessness is dominant; however, it's an INCOMPLETE dominant. This means that you can get some interesting and even extreme variations in the amount of hair an individual dog can have. Hairless cresteds can be seen with everything from absolutely no hair anywhere, to ones that are basically fully coated with a single coat, and everything in between. There is no "magic formula" for breeders to use to produce dogs with the hair only "where it should be". You can breed two hairless cresteds together, that have absolutely no hair and get puppies that not only have hair where you want it, but 'extra' hair where you would prefer not to have it. Conversely, you can breed two hairless cresteds with lots of "extra" hair and end up with puppies that have little or no hair anywhere and, most certainly, none that is "extra". From my experience, and discussing these phenomena with many other breeders, most of us get a range of hairlessness in the majority of our litters. Everything from what some call "true" hairless (those with hair confined to the areas described in the standard), to those with varying amounts of hair on other portions of their bodies. One way to explain this variance in amount of hair is to compare the hairless Chinese Crested to another "hairless breed".....humans. In humans, we get a wide variation in the amount of body hair on individuals from minimal hair on legs, armpits, head, etc. to those who have massive amounts of hair on their legs, backs, and other parts of their anatomy. The same basic principle, regarding amount of hair and placement applies to "both species". As in human families, a wide variation in amount of hair and placement on the Chinese crested can be found in an individual litter. The powderpuff: The AKC standard for the breed says, "The Powderpuff variety is completely covered with a double soft and silky coat. Close examination reveals long, thin guard hairs over the shorter, silky undercoat. The coat is straight, of moderate length and density. Excessively heavy, kinky or curly coat is to be penalized. Grooming is minimal---consisting of presenting a clean and neat appearance."The powderpuff also comes in a wide selection of coat "types". These range from what is referred to as a "terrier" coat, which is short and somewhat harsh, tending to have almost no guard hairs on the legs, to a very long and dramatic coat, that almost sweeps the ground. Once again, virtually all variations in between are possible. We also see a wide selection of coat textures, such as "cottony" coats, that are heavy and hard to keep, being prone to matting; coats with undercoats that are long rather than short; coats where the guard hairs are extremely fine and soft and others that are less fine and very "slick" to the touch. We also get coats that "pattern" at certain ages and take until the animal is three years old or, sometimes, older to develop into a coat that looks as described in the standard. Any, or in some cases, many of the variations can be found in one litter.Now we take all these "variations on a theme" and add in the rest of the standard to the mix. Ideally, dogs are to be between 11 and 13 inches at the shoulder, have almond shaped eyes, a hare (rather extreme) foot and more. Also, in addition to the above mentioned traits, breeders must take into account health issues that include PRA, deafness, LCP, glaucoma, lens luxation and other issues. And, we cannot leave temperament out of this equation. This makes for a very diverse set of traits that must be taken into consideration each time one breeds, or goes to purchase a Chinese Crested. Concentration on one aspect of the breed may well "improve" that particular aspect. However, what effect would it have on the overall dog? Does one sacrifice health to get "true" hairlessness? Does one sacrifice a good puff coat to get temperament? For the overall "health" of the breed and the gene pool (which is not large), this sort of "single mindedness" will only do harm by further reducing the size of the gene pool by decreasing the genetic diversity of an already limited population. If there was some sort of "magic recipe" available to the breeders that would allow us to only produce "true" hairless (with hair only where described in the standard) specimens it would make the lives of breeders so much easier, but, there is no such recipe available. Even those breeders who place an extremely high priority on this particular trait do not get only "true" hairless puppies. So how does one select for one's breeding program? This question has as many answers as there are breeders, but there are common factors that go into most breeders' selections. Things such as structure type, health, temperament, and, yes, how much hair do the hairless have and what type of coats do the puffs have. Each will make their choices based on their own priorities. There is a place in this breed for all the variations on the theme. Without soundness (good structure) type is worthless, yet without type it is not a Chinese Crested. So must one define "type" with the help of the standard ..and prioritize them? Is it more important that the animals have no excess body hair than it is that they have the correct gait, as described in the standard? Is it more important that the animals have an almond shaped eye or correct tail set than that they have a correct puff coat? Is the "hairy" hairless, that has a correctly structured front to be tossed out because it has extra hair? Or the true hairless because it has less lush furnishings? The answer to these for most part is "no". Each has their place in the grand scheme of things for the Chinese Crested. There are positives and negatives to be seen from using both. The hairy hairless with the lovely front will probably mean you have more grooming to do on at least some of your hairless puppies. On the plus side, you can get better dentition in the hairless puppies, more lush furnishings, and assorted other benefits. The true hairless will supply some benefits as well, including the satiny skin, ideal placement of hair, and, over time a reduction in the amount of body hair some of the very hairy ones can have.Since the arrival of the Chinese crested on the AKC show scene, the breed has blossomed as it has been embraced by the show community. So much has improved over the years, since AKC recognition of our charming and unique little breed. Structure, overall health and temperaments are all better today, than they were pre-AKC recognition. Today's Chinese crested is generally more outgoing, sociable and a sounder mover, due to improved structure. One has to remember that not so long before this breed was recognized by AKC, the numbers were literally miniscule...under 500 of them in this country. Along with this, the breeders were not involved in showing, in most cases, not even with other breeds. Their intentions were good. They wanted to make sure this wonderful breed survived and flourished, but they didn't fully comprehend things like structure. On the other hand, while cresteds were still very much a "non-mainstream" breed in the US, they were already in the show rings of England. The difference between the American and English crested of the late '80's and early 90's was marked. With the English dog being much sounder, as the time approached for AKC to recognize the breed, there were many imports to the US. A breed in peril? The truth is just the opposite. The breed is alive and well and now thriving worldwide. A Crested from England circa 1988 A Crested from the US circa 1988 A Crested from the US today In the end, regardless of a breeder's approach and choices, the goal should be a sound, typey, healthy dog with good temperament. This leaves us room for all the wonderful, unique and fascinating variations found within the Chinese Crested. Genetic diversity is an essential element to the overall viability of any breed of animal, without it any group will slowly, or in some cases, not so slowly devolve into extinction. Thank you to Janet Knowles, Susan Miller and Marian Blackman for the use of their photos.
  • Dragonwing likes this

#7
haircrazie016

haircrazie016

    Best In Show

  • Members
  • 2,736 posts
thanks! :D

#8
Dragonwing

Dragonwing

    Newbie

  • Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts
  • LocationSavannah, GA

Thank you so much for this information!  I was originally told the there was no such think as a hairy hairless, they were just shaved down puffs.  :dry:  I own one now and I certainly realize he is no such thing, totally different coat from my puff.  We had an accidental mating (I'd wanted to wait until she had her championship) and was looking to see if there was any chance of a true hairless from the match-up.  I guess I just won't know what I'll get until they're born.  Hoping for only 2 since Sky is only 1 1/2.  I think single pups would be lonely. :happy:  



#9
Esylum

Esylum
  • LocationRunning with Scissors

Eek! Hopefully she will finish her title before any further litters, Is your male crested finished his title? There are always so many little ones out there looking for good homes, one hopes that any crested babies that we are bringing into the world have the health certifications/confirm to the breed standard and other positive characteristics of their parents, so that we can help to keep the breed healthy and structurally sound.

As the owner of cresteds from less then stellar breeders and knowing the heart break that others have had to deal with, we really try to champion the mentality of researching and certifying any potential litters to prevent horrible heart break and birth defects that are more likely to happen from cresteds that we are not sure what their true lines are proven to show. 

 

Fingers crossed for you and your little ones that everything goes smoothly for Momma and babies.






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users