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Interdigital Cysts

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#1
crestedcrazy

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Interdigital Cysts by Leanne Gossett Interdigital Cysts are actually a cellulitic form of deep tissue pyoderma (skin infection). Cellulitus is a condition in which inflammatory fluids are forced into the tissues, rather than being discharged on the surface. Interdigital cysts are characterized as a firm, nodular thickening of the interdigital web. These cysts generally exhibit active stages of deep draining tracts of large pustules in one or more interdigital spaces. Interdigital pyoderma tends to be chronic in nature, therefore a thorough search for the underlying cause is essential. This search can consist of skin scrapings, bacterial cultures and sensitivity tests. Most often the causative factors are found to be infection with staphylococci, ingrown hairs or blockage of a sebaceous gland. Though in some cases a genetic predisposition is suspected, which will necessitate intermittent lifelong antibiotics to control the symptoms. In some cases, the cyst is removed under general anesthesia followed up by appropriate antibiotics. In many cases, interdigital cysts can be eleviated, if only temporarily, by home treatment. Home treatment should not be attempted by novices, it is however a step available to those experienced in dogs and the possible repercussions of interdigital cysts. The following is a brief outline of one fairly successful home treatment course. a) first thoroughly clean the area. b) soak the paw in warm water with Epsom Salts. Some people find it easiest to soak all 4 feet at the same time by standing the dog in a bath tub. c) Do not allow the dog to drink the water. d) Soak for approximately 10 minutes. e) Dry area thoroughly. f) apply Panalog ointment to the area. g) repeat daily until swelling has been gone for 3 days.

#2
Beepharlap

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Skin Care ArticleI know how terrible dealing with skin issues can be. One thing I have noticed with my Cresteds is adults brought into my forest environment have a harder time adjusting than puppies that are born into it. Here is an article that might help you better understand how skin works. http://www.bullterri...m/Skincare.html I hope this helps you better understand how the body uses hair, how acne develops, and helps you deal with the skin problems you are facing. Debra Ball :D

#3
crestedcrazy

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That's a fantastic article Thanks for adding that here!It always help to clear a problem up when one understands how it works!

#4
kiko & krissy

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thanks to both of you. kiko has a lot of cysts and although I think it is genetic i also think there is SOMETHING that can be done...he has very very many blackheads.

#5
crestedcrazy

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I agree Krissy I think alot of it is genetic too, Noid gets these "Pimples" basically between his toes and they swell and hurt and for a few days he can't walk on that paw. I did the salt bath, just warm water with the salts in the kitchen sink and it broke the cyst open and by the next day he was fine again.Noid also has alot of blackheads like Kiko it's better than iot was when he was a pup but due to his diet he has to be on and genetics ect they are something we just have to live with. I mean we do what we can but his skin will never be nice.

#6
Guest_hlboyz_*

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After many years on a chat group with CC owners/breeders I met NO ONE who ever had this problem with their crestie except my Albi. One of the breeders however recognized it as the same as found in bulldogs (a breed she was involved in previously) and told me about it. Basically needed to keep cleaning the area out - no different than I always had done (sigh) but it helped to have some confirmation. To make a long story short, I switched to the keratolux for pearls about two years ago and the most marvelous side effect was that it cleared the area between the "toes" as well. Yep, with nothing but a shampoo scrubbing well, adding a scrub/grit agent sometimes. The stubborn large ones I have easily removed, I wait until they surface (or both Albi and I are in the mood for some "operating" :wink: ), open and remove the sebum and them tweeze out the sac and put a little AB ointment. Voila!I don't know who Leanne (the author) is, but maybe someone call fill her in. Albi has never used oral ABs for his skin and yes, I do know some crestie people who battle pyroderma CONSTANTLY with ABs and panalog and still swear by their doggie dermie. What can I say. Sometimes we get lucky by TRYING stuff! It's another option at least :wink: so will add it under the subject where it belongs.




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