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Denver 5 Months

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16 replies to this topic

#1
deedswan

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So Denny is my first show puppy, And we are going to his first show in April. I believe he has excellent lines I got him from a very good breeder. But I only know agility. I took a few pics of him. Opinions appreciated.

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#2
DebbsHereNow

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gorgeous


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[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC](Left to right, back,) ( cousin) Chester, Rocco, Jay Jay,(front) Bonnie, Vinny and Sophie!Posted Image

#3
PrincessFifi

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I'm no pro on confirmation but he has a very pretty stance! He is one beautiful boy!
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#4
poodlemom

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So handsome, is he for real! Beautiful :)
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Love my dogs

#5
tinaborgen

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such a cutie.

 

need to get him to relax a little more in his back and hind leg region as he tucks them up a bit and curves the back. but that comes with training though :)

 

also important to do some proper ring training walking around in big circles with the dog and get him to do it in various locations and in presence of other people and animals i.e a park. its important that he can relax when being shown and tail up high and proud when walking and not tulked between legs like some do. use lots of praise and treats to get him to love it or playing with toy after he is appreciates that sort of thing. also table training and letting other people familar and unfamiliar to touch him everywhere and open his mouth etc and for him to be comfortable with this.

for a show it all counts nice manners on the table, walking nicely in the ring and to stand nicely whilst the judge walks around looking at the dogs. a confidence and happy dog is thus key to winning :)

 

other than this im not great with confirmation but here is a link if can see it only one can trace down at moment

https://fbcdn-sphoto...341924111_n.jpg


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Posted ImagePosted Image[SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

#6
ann

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He's beautiful. I agree with Tina about getting him to relax a little, and ring training to ensure he shows himself to his best.  The only thing I'd say is that at the moment he's a little square in body. He should be longer than he is tall. Getting him to relax a little and get his hind legs back will relax his top line and extend his length. He's also very much a baby and as he matures he should lengthen in body. Most judges will allow for that as he's a baby. He has a nice straight front, good shoulders,  good neck length, nice dark eyes,  a lovely head and good ear carriage. Good luck in the ring. If you haven't shown before, a little tip. Don't go first. Watch the other handlers in your class, and make sure you listen to what the judge asks you to do when you move him. Nothing more annoying when you're the judge, than asking a handler to move in  a certain direction, only to have them go a different way. Not sure how your judges move you in the States but in the UK we do a triangle, then up and down in a straight line, then a full circle of the ring. Above all, relax and enjoy the day. It's just a dog show, and you get to take the best dog home whatever the outcome.


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 When the power of love overcomes the love of power, the world will know peace, Jimi Hendrix. All dogs go to Heaven, but some dogs live in Hell. Please don't support puppy farmers.


#7
deedswan

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Thank you everyone for the advise. We have taken a few private lessons and just went to our first big conformation class. ( I think every in town brought there Great Dane or German Shepard. ). He walks very nice on the lead but is a scared to have people touch him. Our first show is in April. So I have a little time to work with him on Meeting people and stacking him. Great advise on not going first. I plan on putting him in the 6-9 month puppy class. Thanks again. For everyone's kind words.

#8
OutiDivin

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He looks pretty good.  How is his attitude?  Make sure he is happy in the ring.  This is a big deal in crested ... you can have a fabulous conformation dog and if he's shy and has his tail down in the show ring he will have a hard time getting points.  "happy, happy, happy" that's the way to go.  

 

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#9
deedswan

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He looks pretty good.  How is his attitude?  Make sure he is happy in the ring.  This is a big deal in crested ... you can have a fabulous conformation dog and if he's shy and has his tail down in the show ring he will have a hard time getting points.  "happy, happy, happy" that's the way to go.  
 
Outi


He moves like a dream and shows no fear.....until I put him on the table, not sure how to get over that. I have been taking him everywhere and meeting people so hopefully he will get over it.

#10
Wijic

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I might try making it a game for him. If he likes something creamy (peanut butter, cream cheese, chopped liver, etc), maybe place him on the table for a few seconds and let him lick the gooey goodness from your fingers. (I like gooey, because you can hold your hand in a way that keeps his head up while he eats, so he's not getting in the habit of hunching down on the show table). Once he seems more comfortable and optimistic on the show table, you can move from treating him on it to treating him after, and hopefully the happy and the anticipation of reward will stick.


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#11
Chelsey

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On Thing you need to be careful of is that he does not learn to stand with his feet up under him like he is in the first picture. Your dog can be the best dog ever but if they don't present themselves well, then you can not reward it. It's not always natural for a dog to stand in a perfect stack. You have to learn to teach them to get used to having their feet in that position. You need to only reward him when he is standing where his feet should be. The hock should be at a 90 degree angle to the floor. It is hard to tell what his actual topline would look like when he is standing like this.

Here is a video of my Working with my Ka'Ching. Notice how he has to have his feet placed correctly before I reward him. And if he does not then I manipulate him until his feet are correct.

 

Well for some reason it won't let me post the link? That is odd???


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#12
Laura

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Chelsey, here's the movie you wanted to post.

 


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#13
Chelsey

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You are the best, Laura! Thank you!!

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#14
deedswan

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Thank you Chelsey for the video, You make it look so easy.

#15
Chelsey

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It can take some time and a whole lot of repetition, but it will pay off hugely. Ting just finished his championship yesterday and he is still very much learning all I would like him to do in the ring. Seems alot of people think in conformation you just walk a dog around the ring, but that is definitely not the case! Dogs also never naturally step forward with their front feet first (weird but true!) So teach a dog to move their front feet and not their back can be very hard. If you see in the video I use the leash to tell him when to move his front feet forward. Getting them to get the hang of it takes some major practice!

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#16
deedswan

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I was one of those people who thought, how hard can it be prancing your dog around the ring. I think agility is way easier lol. There is quite a lot to learn. My breeder has 4 puppies she is taking to the specialty in Oklahoma in May. And she wants me to help socialize and leash train. This is a whole new avenue for me.

#17
Chelsey

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Lol its a different kind of hard. Its more patience and and major repetition on really small things. When you see Ting fix his front feet in that video you have no idea ho much work that took lol. Do you know where the feet should ideally be placed or do you need some help with that? We will be at the specialty too :-)
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