Jump to content

Welcome to Chinese Crested Crush
Register now to gain access to all of our features. Once registered and logged in, you will be able to create topics, post replies to existing threads, give reputation to your fellow members, get your own private messenger, post status updates, manage your profile and so much more. If you already have an account, login here - otherwise create an account for free today!
Photo

How to Give Canine CPR

- - - - -

  • Please log in to reply
7 replies to this topic

#1
crestedcrazy

crestedcrazy

    Noidinator Moderator

  • Moderators
  • 28,072 posts
  • LocationHere there everywhere
How to Give Canine CPR By Lori S. Mohr (as referenced by First Aid For Dogs by Tim Hawcroft)CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) is the process of breathing life back into an unconscious human. A similar technique can also work effectively on dogs. The signs that indicate the need for CPR include unconsciousness, lack of arousal, lack of physical movement, or eye blinking. These symptoms can occur from drowning, choking, electrical shock, or a number of other situations. The key to canine CPR is remembering the ABCs: Airway, Breathing, and Cardiac compression. To perform the three techniques, follow these steps. Lay the dog on a flat surface on its right side and extend the head back to create an airway. Open the jaws to check for obstructions, and if any exist and are not easily removed, do one of two things, depending on the size of the dog. For small dogs, hold them upside down by their back end and shake vigorously to try removing the obstruction. For large dogs, lay them on their side and, if necessary, use long-nosed pliers to remove the obstruction. Cup your hands around the muzzle of the dog's mouth so that only the nostrils are clear. Blow air into the nostrils with five or six quick breaths, again, depending on the size of the dog. Small dogs and puppies and require short and shallow breaths. Larger dogs need longer and deeper breaths. Continue the quick breaths at a rate of one breath every three seconds or 20 breaths per minute. Check for a heartbeat by using your finger on the inside of the thigh, just above the knee. If you don't feel a pulse, put your hand over the dog's chest cavity where the elbow touches the middle of the chest.If you still don't find a pulse, have one person continue breathing into the nostrils (mouth to snout), while another gives cardiac massage. Give the dog a cardiac massage by placing both hands palms down between the third and sixth rib on the chest cavity. For large dogs, place your hands on top of each other. For small dogs or puppies, place one hand or thumb on the chest. Use the heel of your hand(s) to push down for 10 quick compressions and then check to see if consciousness has been restored. If consciousness has not been restored, continue the compressions in cycles of about 10 every six seconds for 10 cycles a minute. After each cycle of compression, the other person should give the dog two breaths of air in the nostrils. If only one person is present, this procedure can still be done successfully. Once the dog has started breathing, contact a veterinarian immediately.

#2
Tessie's Mom

Tessie's Mom

    Top Dog!

  • Members
  • 4,864 posts
As always...good information....hope i never need it.

#3
Mr.Crowley

Mr.Crowley

    Best In Show

  • Members
  • 3,467 posts
Thanks for posting this Sheri. It's something we all should know.ps, I made it a sticky

#4
crestedcrazy

crestedcrazy

    Noidinator Moderator

  • Moderators
  • 28,072 posts
  • LocationHere there everywhere
Welcome! and being a sticky is a good idea easy to find that way!

#5
Shell

Shell

    Top Dog!

  • Members
  • 5,868 posts
Boy, this really helpsThanks for the detailed description on how to save a dog from choking. I have always thought about what I'd do if Dargo started choking.Now I'll be prepared if needed. Shell.

#6
ann

ann
  • LocationBerkshire. England. UK.
Always a usefull thing to know. It saved my "Havoc" on two occations. She was dreadfull for grabbing and swallowing food.My son dropped a lump of cheese once and she grabbed it and swallowed it whole before he could get it. Have you ever tried getting that out of a panicking dogs throat. She was unconsious by the time i got it out. :shock: Cpr saved her.

#7
LaurennAbi

LaurennAbi

    Crate Trained

  • Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 50 posts
thanks for this! Mind if I use this on my animal care website?x

#8
parsnip_pixie

parsnip_pixie

    Pup

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 28 posts
This is definitely useful information but I'd also like to add a little wisdom to the compression part...Please be careful! You want to make sure your compressions are deep but not too deep and not too heavy! What I mean by this is that CPR is not about arm strength but about the depth that you can achieve with the heel of your hand. However, If your compressions are too heavy and/or too deep you could end up breaking some ribs or causing other types of internal damage to the chest and organs. Excessive compression depth will actually dimish the effectiveness of CPR - as will compressions that are too light or infrequent.I know this reads like a conundrum but what I'd like to stress is training. You would take a CPR class before attempting to do CPR on a human, and the same should go with your pets. The Red Cross offers Pet First Aid classes that teach CPR, as do some community colleges that have veterinary technology programs. At my emergency clinic we see a lot of patients come in that owners meant well but ended up making the situation much worse because they didn't have the training for CPR. CPR is not a DIY off the internet, this is a life saving technique you want to be confident and knowledgeable about if the time comes (God willing, it won't), so please take the time to get some training before then.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users